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Chain of command

 
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Gruff
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Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 418
Location: Plymouth

PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 5:28 pm    Post subject: Chain of command Reply with quote

I'm interested to know - what ranks existed in the different arms of a civil war army?

I'm doing a bit of research into William Gould when he was captain of a troop of cavalry under Colonel/General William Ruthven and Major-General James Chudleigh respectively but I'd like to know what ranks would have existed between captain and colonel or general and would all of these ranks neccessarily have been present at an engagement?

Also, as a cavalry captain, who would Gould have given his orders to?


Last edited by Gruff on Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:37 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Rob Jones



Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 327
Location: Somerset

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gould would have had a lieutenant as his second in command, a cornet carrying the troop's standard (this was often a young officer learning the ropes - a bit like Mr Webb Wink ) and a quartermaster who was responisble for billeting the men and could take command in the absence of other officers. Beneath them were three corporals, each commanding one of the three squadrons of the troop, a formation of approximately 60 men. Each troop was assigned two trumpeters to convey the orders.

Early in the war individual troops were raised and fought as such, as late as Edgehill. Regiments were formed with a figurehead colonel (often a general whose duties lay at brigade level or higher). In his absence a lieutenant-colonel was often the commander of the regiment. Beneath him, and providing most of the day-to-day and battlefield leadership was the sergeant-major (not, as in the modern army, a non-commissioned rank, but a commissioned officer).

This organisation is the ideal, of course, and during a campaign numbers could fluctuate as officers and men fell ill or in battle.
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Gruff
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Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 418
Location: Plymouth

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2008 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great, cheers!
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